Angels of Wickford  LbNA # 19309 (ARCHIVED)

OwnerAdoptable    
Placed DateNov 18 2005
CountyWashington
LocationNorth Kingstown, RI
Boxes4
Planted ByTrishK      
Found By Warrior Woman
Last Found Dec 2 2005
StatusFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFa  
Hike Distance?

These boxes will only be available through the end of the year. They will not survive the summer foot traffic in Wickford.

Difficulty - An easy walk, bike or drive (or even sea kayak via a different route) to different spots around Wickford, a charming, historic village on Narragansett Bay. Most of these boxes could easily be done after dark, especially if you come to see the town all lit up for Christmas.

Background - This series of boxes takes you through some of the more scenic parts of Wickford. You can choose to walk, ride or drive to the different location. If you have the time and good weather I recommend one of the first two (1-1/2 miles round trip). Wickford is reported to contain the most dense concentration of original late Revolutionary and Federal period houses anywhere in New England. The two main streets that you will travel (Brown and Main) are full of delightful shops and eateries that will guarantee you an enjoyable stroll on your way to the next box. NOTE: These boxes are all small and do not contain pens or stamp pads.

Directions - Route 95 South to Exit 9. Route 4 South to Exit 5A (Route 102 South). Continue through 4 lights into Wickford Village. At stop sign, bear right over bridge. Turn left at the first light (Beach St). The parking lot is at the end of the road to the right. This cluster of three buildings contains the senior center, Cold Spring Community Center and the Wickford Art Association. Rhode Island has more artists per capita than any other state in the country. Wickford is home of what is arguably the finest juried art festival in New England every July and is sponsored by the Wickford Art Association.

Alicia’s Angel – Facing the community center, follow the building around to the back left corner. Look SW for a large rock with a small split rock low to its left. Alicia’s Angel can be found behind this lower rock.

Cherub #2 - Return via Beach St to Rt 1A and turn right and go over the bridge. At this point where the road splits go right down Brown St. Take your time and browse through the many delightful shops on the street. Just after Brooks Drugs and opposite Ryan Market (where the bag boys will still carry your gorceries to your car for you) is the town parking area. Turn in and go to the back of the parking lot where there is a pocket size park on the picturesque harbor. On a nice day in the summer it will be full or sailboats, kayaks and swans taking advantage of the water. Follow the park and it's roped fence along the water to the right to where there are three cleated posts and the walk ends. Look between the posts for Cherub #2.

Cherub #1 - Return to Brown Street and continue heading north to cross a small bridge. Right after the bridge is Allens Wharf, with it delightful deck and intriguing shops overlooking the water. Take a seat at the far end of the deck on the bench to admire the wares of Midnight Sun or American Bay Outfitters. Reach under the seat to the left for Cherub #2.

Seraphim – Return to Brown St and go right until the street Ts at Main. On the book store on the right corner you will see a brass plaque indicating the flood water level during the hurricane of '38. One of the most destructive hurricanes (Cat 3) to ever hit the US it came ashore during high tide and was reported to have caused 564deaths. The storm surge was 15 - 20 feet above normal through much of southern New England. Turn left on Main and notice Wickford Gourmet on the right. Your journey is almost over. I would recommend going in to stop for a culinary treat or cup of latte. You can take your purchases out the back door and sit at the bench under the Spring Pottery sign. At the base of the left leg is Seraphim.

Be an angel and rehide these boxes well.

For more info on Wickford:
Picture Tour of Wickford - http://www.npj.com/homepage/teritowe/histwick.html
Wickford.com